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Japan’s ex-princess Mako, husband arrive to new life in New York

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Japan's former princess Mako Komuro (3rd L) and her husband Kei Komuro (2nd R) are seen leaving Tokyo for New York on November 13, 2021 after tying the knot last month./AFP
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Nov 15, 2021 - 09:25 AM

NEW YORK — Japan’s former princess Mako Komuro arrived in the United States on Sunday with her husband, swapping ancient imperial rites for the bright lights of New York after leaving the royal family.

The pair tied the knot in Tokyo last month in muted fashion, following years of tabloid gossip and online sniping over their union that Komuro said caused her “sadness and pain.”

Footage broadcast on Japanese TV channels showed the couple flanked by security officials as they made their way through New York’s John F. Kennedy airport and into a waiting vehicle.

A move to the United States had long been rumored. The two 30-year-olds finally boarded a commercial flight Sunday from Tokyo to New York, where Kei Komuro attended law school and now works.

Mako, the niece of Emperor Naruhito, lost her royal title when she married a commoner under postwar succession laws that only allow male members of the imperial family to ascend to the throne.

After announcing their engagement in 2017, the Komuros were confronted with a barrage of reports alleging that Kei’s family had run into financial difficulties.

Japan’s royals are held to exacting standards, and the Imperial Household Agency said Mako developed complex post-traumatic stress disorder because of the media attention.

“I have been scared, feeling sadness and pain whenever one-sided rumors turn into groundless stories,” Mako said at a press conference after their marriage.

Kei said he felt “very sad that Mako has been in a bad condition, mentally and physically,” declaring: “I love Mako. We only get one life, and I want us to spend it with the one we love.”

The controversy surrounding the pair, and their US move, has drawn inevitable comparisons to another royal couple: Britain’s Prince Harry and Meghan Markle.

Japanese media said the Komuros, who met at university in Tokyo, have already secured a place to live in New York, though it was not clear where in the city they had chosen to set up their new life.

The original plan had been for Kei to travel to the United States ahead of Mako, with the former princess joining him after she got her first passport, reports said.

But Kei stayed in Japan longer than expected to attend the funeral of Mako’s grandfather.

Japan’s emperor holds no political power, but is an important figurehead.

With a dwindling supply of male royals, there has been some debate over changing the rules in Japan, with polls showing the public broadly supports women being allowed to rule.

But any change is likely to be slow, with traditionalists vehemently opposed.

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