fbpx
Cellulant Recognised as a Leading Payment Platform Solutions Provider in Nigeria for its Tingg PlatformRead more Binance Signs Cristiano Ronaldo for Exclusive PartnershipRead more Human Rights Volunteer Roles to Return for FIFA World Cup QatarRead more White House ‘Social Media Summit’: No Facebook, No Twitter, No Transparency CopyRead more White House ‘Social Media Summit’: No Facebook, No Twitter, No TransparencyRead more White House ‘Social Media Summit’: No Facebook, No Twitter, No TransparencyRead more White House ‘Social Media Summit’: No Facebook, No Twitter, No TransparencyRead more White House ‘Social Media Summit’: No Facebook, No Twitter, No TransparencyRead more White House ‘Social Media Summit’: No Facebook, No Twitter, No TransparencyRead more Twitter to Label Tweets by Leaders Who Break Its RulesRead more

Inmate set to be first woman executed by US in decades seeks clemency

show caption
Death row inmate Lisa Montgomery -- seen in a photo released in 2004 -- is set to be the first woman executed by the US federal government in nearly 70 years./AFP
Print Friendly and PDF

Jan 06, 2021 - 07:31 AM

WASHINGTON — Lawyers for Lisa Montgomery, slated to be the first woman executed by the US federal government in decades, sought clemency from President Donald Trump Tuesday claiming she was profoundly mentally ill when she committed murder in 2004.

In a last-ditch effort to prevent her execution going ahead on January 12, they told Trump in a letter that Montgomery was born brain-damaged and endured a life of extreme abuse before committing her crime.

“Broken before she was born, Lisa Montgomery’s life was filled with torture, terror, failure, and betrayal,” they wrote.

“You alone have the power to temper Justice with Mercy,” they wrote Trump.

“You alone have the power to send a message to the thousands of women who have been the victim of childhood rape and trafficking that their pain matters — that they matter — that their lives have value.”

They requested Trump commute her death sentence to life in prison without parole.

Montgomery, 52, was sentenced to death for the murder of a pregnant, 23-year-old Missouri dog breeder, Bobbie Jo Stinnett.

The crime was particularly gruesome and pre-meditated.

Under the guise of buying a puppy, Montgomery went to Stinnett’s home, where she strangled her to death, and cut the baby from her body.

She then travelled back to her home in Kansas and told her unsuspecting husband that the baby was hers.

Montgomery’s lawyers do not contest the facts, but say her defense was mishandled and the court ignored her history of mental illness.

Two prosecutors who have dealt with similar cases supported the clemency request.

“We know from first-hand experience that these crimes are inevitably the product of serious mental illness. Women who commit such crimes also are likely to have been victimized themselves,” they wrote.

“These are important factors that make death sentences inappropriate.”

The last woman to be executed by the US federal government was convicted murderer Bonnie Heady in 1953, according to the Death Penalty Information Center.

Montgomery is one of 13 federal death-row inmates whose executions the Trump Justice Department decided last year to go through with after a 17-year halt to carrying out death sentences.

The hiatus was prompted by questions about execution methods and broader opposition to the practice.

Ten have been executed since July and three more, including Montgomery, are scheduled before Trump’s presidency ends on January 20.

A supporter of the death penalty, Trump has not intervened in any capital case.

Joe Biden, who will replace Trump as president in 15 days, opposes the death penalty and has criticized the Trump administration’s resumption of executions.

LMBCNEWS.COM uses both Facebook and Disqus comment systems to make it easier for you to contribute. We encourage all readers to share their views on our articles and blog posts. All comments should be relevant to the topic. By posting, you agree to our Privacy Policy. We are committed to maintaining a lively but civil forum for discussion, so we ask you to avoid personal attacks, name-calling, foul language or other inappropriate behavior. Please keep your comments relevant and respectful. By leaving the ‘Post to Facebook’ box selected – when using Facebook comment system – your comment will be published to your Facebook profile in addition to the space below. If you encounter a comment that is abusive, click the “X” in the upper right corner of the Facebook comment box to report spam or abuse. You can also email us.